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Wednesday, October 23
 

6:45pm

Attendee Reception at National Museum of Scotland
Join attendees of LinuxCon + CloudOpen Europe, Automotive Linux Summit, KVM Forum, Xen Developer Summit and Kernel Summit at the National Museum of Scotland for dinner, drinks, casino gaming and more.

Buses depart the EICC at 6:45pm. 

Wednesday October 23, 2013 6:45pm - 10:00pm
National Museum of Scotland Chambers St, Edinburgh EH1 1JF, United Kingdom
 
Thursday, October 24
 

8:30am

Registration
Thursday October 24, 2013 8:30am - 5:00pm
Strathblane Hall

9:30am

Timeline For Embedded Linux - Chris Simmonds, Consultant, 2net Limited
Today, Linux is woven into the fabric of our technology. Things such as printers, routers, TVs and phones all have their own "Inner Penguin". Yet it was never originally intended to be used beyond desktop and server PCs. A lot of things had to happen before Linux could break out of the PC
environment and make its way in the world as a jobbing jack-of-all-trades. Since the early beginnings of embedded Linux in the late 1990's many people have contributed time and know-how that has resulted in today's Linux based embedded operating systems. This talk describes some of the key milestones and the events and people behind them.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 9:30am - 10:10am
Pentland

10:10am

Break
Thursday October 24, 2013 10:10am - 10:40am
Foyer

10:40am

A Portable Clock Cycle Based Performance Measurement System - Michael Christofferson, Enea
In real-time development, it is often the case that direct end-to-end time measurements and statistics are needed to determine program, design, or specification correctness, and often involves both kernel events and user space or application events. This presentation describes a portable set of open source tools, API’s, and programs for implementation of timing measures between multiple software events based on clock cycles. A CPU abstraction layer is provided for portability to any CPU architecture, and can be used in both kernel and user space, and across events in both spaces. Statistics are collected in the kernel by migrating a RRD database implementation as a statistical kernel module. This in itself can be a nice addition to the kernel. Information about kernel data will be exposed to the user over procfs or sysfs or via a socket or device in /dev/ directory. Information about processes profiled in user space will be executed by means of a dedicated monitoring daemon. The tools provide an easy method for code instrumentation and extraction of results that will benefit most in the real-time Linux development community.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Christofferson, Enea

Michael Christofferson, Enea

Product Marketing Director, Enea
Previous speaking: 2014 - 1) ELC San Jose, April 29-May 2, 2014, "User Space Drivers in Linux – Pros, Cons, and Implementation Issues. In 2013 - 1) Linux Embedded Systems Conference San Franciso, Feb 20-22 2013 on the "Yocto Meta-Virtualization Project", 2) LinuxCon/Cloud Open North America, Sept 2014, on "A Platform Independent, Clock Cycle Based Performance Measurement System”, 3) The Embedded World Conference, Europe/Edinburgh, Oct... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Fintry

10:40am

How Not to Write X86 Platform Drivers - Darren Hart, Intel Open Source Technology Center
The MinnowBoard has introduced a unique x86 platform to the hobbyist board space. With a lengthy list of connectivity options and expansion capabilities, many of the common approaches to writing x86 drivers were not a particularly good match as what is known as the base board configuration can change from board to board as inventors experiment. However, introducing board files and non-discoverable platform drivers to an architecture defined by a discoverable platform and single images is not the way forward.

Speakers
DH

Darren Hart

Linux Kernel Engineer, Intel
Darren maintains the Linux x86 platform drivers and represents Intel to the LF's Real-Time Working Group and OSADL's SIL2LinuxMP project. He is known for his previous technical leadership of the MinnowBoard program and Yocto Project Intel BSPs. Prior to Intel, he led the Real-Time Linux development team at IBM. Darren is a well known speaker at open source conferences on topics including PREEMPT_RT, Embedded Linux, Intel Platform Enabling, and... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Tinto

10:40am

How to Beat the Codesweats with the Yocto Project - David Stewart, Intel Open Source Technology Center
In his keynote at the last Embedded Linux Conference, David shared a sample of the paranoia embedded developers should be exhibiting over security risks but often don't. In this follow-up, David will share the stream of surprising and useful security features added to the Yocto Project, and demonstrate some of the new features which accelerate developer productivity and fun.

Speakers
avatar for David Stewart

David Stewart

Engineering Manager, Intel Corporation
David Stewart is the manager of the Server Language Optimization Team at Intel. David has been an operating systems development expert for his whole career, starting out with Unix in 1980. David was in the Open Source Technology Center since 2007, and held other software positions at Intel since 1997. Prior to that, David was at Sequent, Tektronix, and CFI. David holds a BS and MS in Computer Science from Colorado State University. David has... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Carrick Suite

10:40am

LTSI: Long Term Stable Kernel and it's Testing - Tsugikazu Shibata, NEC & Hisao Munakata, Renesas
LTSI is kept providing Linux Kernel for Embedded Industry with long term support. Many of industry people involved with the activities and some companies using LTSI for real products. There were a number of discussion in LTSI about rack of testing because testing is a mandatory requirement for industry usage. As the next step of LTSI, we are trying to discuss with industry people how we will be able to improve the framework to share the testing. In the presentation, we will update this years LTSI version and also how we will be able to share testing among the industry and the community.

Speakers
avatar for Hisao Munakata

Hisao Munakata

executive manager, Renesas
Munakata leads upstream kernel development team in Renesas to encourage developer to send more patched to the upstream. Also he actively works for Linux Foundation CE working. Automotive Grade Linux and other Linux Foundation project for the long time. He did various presentation, keynote and BoFs at various Linux Foundation and other conferences.
avatar for Tsugikazu Shibata

Tsugikazu Shibata

Chief Advavnced Technologist, Open Source Promotion Center, NEC
Tsugikazu Shibata is LTSI Project lead. Tsugikazu Shibata is Chief advanced Technologies of NEC and he has been working on coordinating the relationship between industry and community since the early days of Japanese Linux community. He have spoken at number of Open Source conferences such as LinuxCon, Embedded Linux Conference and OpenStack summit. He is also a board member of the Linux Foundation.


Thursday October 24, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Pentland

11:40am

Device Tree for Dummies! - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons
The conversion of the ARM Linux kernel over to the Device Tree as the mechanism to describe the hardware has been a significant change for ARM kernel developers. Nowadays, all developers porting the Linux kernel on new ARM platforms, either new SOCs or new boards, have to work with the Device Tree. Based on practical examples, this talk intends to provide a "getting started guide" for newcomers in the Device Tree world: what is the Device Tree? How is it written and compiled? How do the bootloader and kernel interact? How are Device Tree bindings written and documented? What are the best practices for writing Device Trees and the bindings?

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.


Thursday October 24, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Fintry

11:40am

Extending the swsusp Hibernation Framework to ARM - Russell Dill, Texas Instruments
This talk looks at bringing hibernation support to ARM, with a focus on OMAP. The presentation will include a brief technical overview of the swsusp framework (the mainline hibernation framework), followed by an in-depth discussion of an implementation on AM33XX and the issues encountered. The talk will also touch on topics closely related to hibernation such as snapshot boot, hibernation restore from bootloader, and self-refresh only suspend/off modes. Issues related to mainlining will also be discussed.

Speakers
RD

Russell Dill

Applications Engineer, Texas Instruments
Russ Dill is a Applications Engineer working with the Linux Core Product Development team at Texas Instruments. His primary task involves supporting single core products in the mainline Linux kernel, focusing on AM33XX. His embedded Linux experience goes back more than 10 years and includes speaking experience at a past Embedded Linux Conference. Russ is currently working towards his Masters in Computer Science at Arizona State University where... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Carrick Suite

11:40am

Maintainer's Diary - We Have a Scaling Problem - Wolfram Sang, Consultant
It surely is a great thing that so many vendors started to contribute to the Linux Kernel and hobbyists still add a lot of value. While the amount of contributors steadily increases, the amount of reviewers does not raise at the same level, sadly. This will cause trouble, be it that some subsystem becomes a bottleneck or patches with questionable quality enter the kernel. In his presentation, Wolfram talks about the status quo of the subsystems needed for a typical SoC. The audience will learn about their "latencies", other specialities, and where problems might be waiting. Adding personal experience from the I2C subsystem, recommendations are given on personal level and also on a bigger scale.

Speakers
WS

Wolfram Sang

Kernel Developer, Consultant
Wolfram Sang has been working as a Linux kernel developer for embedded systems since 2008. He maintains the I2C subsystem and works as a consultant, mainly for the Renesas Upstream Kernel Team. Programming since his childhood, he still hacks his machines from the 80s, especially the C64. When not using computers, he is interested in ecological topics, likes cooking and tries to keep his Japanese alive. He has spoken at various conferences like... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Tinto

11:40am

Small Business BoFs - Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons
Conferences like ELC and ELCE are excellent opportunities for small embedded Linux companies to meet, exchange experience and know each other better. This makes it possible to cooperate on customer projects which are too big for a single company, and to take advantage of the specific skills of each partner. We invite small business owners and employees to join this Birds of a Feather session. Rather than having sequential company presentations which can cause unbounded latencies, participants will first be invited to open an Etherpad and share their company name, location and their core area of expertise. The BoF will continue with discussions sharing experience and solutions for dealing with customers, building the business and its reputation, managing projects and engineering resources, all this without having to sell one's sould to the Devil.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Opdenacker

Michael Opdenacker

CEO, Free Electrons
Michael Opdenacker is the founder of Free Electrons, a company offering development, consulting and training services to embedded Linux system developers worldwide. We get paid to maximize Linux' world domination!


Thursday October 24, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Pentland

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday October 24, 2013 12:30pm - 2:00pm
On Your Own

1:00pm

1:30pm

2:00pm

2:00pm

Devicetree: The Disaster so Far - Mark Rutland, ARM, Ltd.
Historically the ARM Linux port was driven by board files, where all the information necessary to run on a particular SoC was contained within the kernel. With an explosion of SoC variations, and the churn necessary to support it, the ARM Linux community turned to devicetree as the solution to all of our problems. Unfortunately, the churn has moved to bindings and drivers, introducing new problems. The rate at which bindings are added means many do not get the thorough review they require, and bindings are entering the kernel before the general case is understood, often requiring incompatible boot ABI changes. This talk will give an overview of these problems, the steps currently being taken to mitigate them, and the direction we must take going forward to ensure long-term compatibility of bindings and the kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Rutland

Mark Rutland

Kernel Hacker, ARM
Mark Rutland is a kernel developer at ARM Ltd, based in Cambridge, UK. Mark contributes to the arm and arm64 ports, working on boot infrastructure and firmware interfaces (e.g. ACPI, DT, PSCI, UEFI), working on both the kernel support code and the specifications themselves. Along with others he co-maintains Device Tree bindings and PSCI support.


Thursday October 24, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Carrick Suite

2:00pm

Fighting Latency: How to Optimize Your System Using Perf - Mischa Jonker, Synopsys
With increasing CPU speeds, other bottlenecks arise; e.g. branch prediction and memory latency. In this talk we’ll explore how to identify performance issues using perf, and how to take these bottlenecks away. We’ll discuss prefetching (both hardware and software), conditional execution, and how we can use the compiler to help us. Finally, we'll do an analysis of the resulting improvements using both simulations and actual RTL.

Speakers
MJ

Mischa Jonker

Software Engineer, Synopsys
Mischa Jonker started at NXP as a graduation student, back in 2005. After researching and benchmarking several power management techniques he started supporting NXP's business lines and customers with applying Linux in their products. Today, with Synopsys, he is busy with creating and maintaining an open source eco-system around the ARC processor family.


Thursday October 24, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Pentland

2:00pm

Keeping it Green: Integrated QA with the Yocto Project - Paul Eggleton, Intel's Open Source Technology Centre
The Yocto Project provides a standard way for embedded systems developers to build a customised Linux-based OS from sources. To help catch regressions during development, an easily extendable automated testing framework is being integrated into the build system; a key focus area for the upcoming Yocto Project 1.5 release. In this presentation, Paul will describe some of the new features being developed by the Yocto Project to automatically identify regressions, as well as review the existing QA tools, and will demonstrate how you can use these to maintain quality in your embedded projects.

Speakers
PE

Paul Eggleton

Embedded Linux Engineer, Intel's Open Source Technology Centre
Paul Eggleton is an embedded Linux engineer working for Intel's Open Source Technology Centre. A long time member of the OpenEmbedded community, Paul joined Intel in November 2010 to work on the Yocto Project, concentrating mostly on core build system enhancements. Paul has been a software developer for 10 years and a contributor to a number of Open Source projects, and was a speaker at FOSDEM 2012.


Thursday October 24, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Fintry

2:00pm

Verified Boot on Chrome OS and How to do it yourself - Simon Glass, Google
Chrome OS uses a first stage read-only firmware and second-stage updatable firmware. The updatable firmware is signed and contains kernel keys and a dm-verify hash, so that the firmware, Linux kernel and root filesystem are all protected against corruption and attack. This system is described and discussed. As part of Google's upstream efforts in U-Boot, a generalized secure boot system has been developed and released with U-Boot 2013.07. This implementation uses the FIT format, which collects together images, such as kernels, device tree, RAM disks. Support is provided for TPMs (Trust Platform Module), RSA-based signing and verificaiton, and hashing with hardware acceleration. This system is also described and discussed, along with the specific steps needed to implement it in your designs.

Speakers
avatar for Simon Glass

Simon Glass

Software Engineer, Google Inc
After writing a programmable RDBMS on ARM computers, Simon Glass worked at ARM in Cambridge, UK setting up the applications group, smart card effort and then working on ARM10. Returning to New Zealand, he started Bluewater Systems and grew it to 20 people, focussing on embedded ARM electronics/Linux. Simon then joined Google and to work on ARM Chromebooks (firmware lead). Simon is a primary contributor to U-Boot and maintains driver model and x86... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Tinto

2:45pm

3:00pm

Common Clock Framework: How To Use It - Gregory Clement, Free Electrons
The common clock framework, which was included in the 3.4 kernel in the beginning of 2012, is now mandatory to support all new ARM SoCs. It is also part of the "one zImage to run them all" big plan of the ARM architecture in the Linux kernel. After an introduction on why we needed this framework and on the problems it solves, we will go through the implementation details of this framework. Then, with real examples, we will focus on how to use this framework to add clock support to a new ARM SoC. We will also show how the device tree is used in this process. The last part of the talk will review how device drivers use this framework, using examples taken from various parts of the kernel.This talk is an update of the one given at ELC 2013. It will cover the new features introduced since the beginning of the year.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Clement

Gregory Clement

Embedded Linux Software Engineer, Free Electrons
Gregory Clement is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Free Electrons since 2010. He has 15 years of on the field experience in porting and operating embedded Linux on many hardware architectures. He is currently involved in the integration of Marvell Armada 370/375/38x/39x/XP and the new ARM64 37xx/7K/8K SoC support in the mainline Linux kernel, acting as co-maintainer for the mvebu ARM sub-architecture (which includes the orion5x... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Fintry

3:00pm

From Weak to Weedy: Effective Use of Memory Barriers in the ARM Linux Kernel - Will Deacon, ARM, Ltd.
The ARMv7/v8 architectures feature weakly-ordered memory models, allowing hardware designers to implement a variety of optimisations in the memory subsystem. Whilst this can improve the performance and power consumption of embedded ARM CPUs, it can also lead to subtle software bugs which are incredibly hard to debug. As a result, software engineers tend to use either too many barrier instructions or heavyweight variants to err on the side of caution. Both of these practices have performance costs, which will increase as the number of cores on a typical SoC continues to rise. This presentation describes the various barrier instructions in the ARM architecture and how to use them in the Linux kernel. It will also introduce changes proposed to the ARM kernel port allowing users of barriers to control their propagation within the system and measurably improve performance.

Speakers
avatar for Will Deacon

Will Deacon

Staff Software Engineer, ARM
Will Deacon is a kernel hacker at ARM Ltd, where he works primarily on the architecture side of things for both the arm and arm64 ports of Linux. He generally works on adding support for new architectural features to Linux, but also enjoys improving and optimising the code that is already there, particularly in the areas of low-level synchronisation and memory manangement. Inside the kernel, Will maintains the recently merged ARM SMMU driver as... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Carrick Suite

3:00pm

Linux From Sensors to Servers- When is Linux not Linux? - Jonathan Austin, ARM, Ltd.
It's possible to build Linux for tiny devices without MMUs through to enormous multi-core servers. But is there anything remotely similar about the resulting systems? Is it sane to run Linux on a micro-controller? This talk will compare the anatomy of a uClinux/noMMU system to 'normal' ones, specifically looking at the difference between Linux running on Cortex A, R and M-class cores (M-class support has recently arrived in mainline!). Areas covered will include: notable missing kernel features (eg fork()!), binary format support, shared libraries, multitasking and security, as well as some of the implications to userspace of these differences. It will also cover some of the possible improvements to the way Linux uses features of R/M class cores, hopefully provoking some discussion on, for example, how to make better use of the Memory Protection Unit (supported in 3.11).

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Austin

Jonathan Austin

Kernel Hacker, ARM, Ltd.
Jonathan Austin works as a kernel hacker at ARM Ltd, specialising in Linux support for ARM's R and M class processor lines (those without MMUs), most recently adding basic support for ARM's Memory Protection Unit and Cortex-R7. Outside ARM, Jonathan Co-founded Makespace Cambridge (a hacker/makerspace), finally resulting in a sweet place to get together and make things! He gave a keynote talk at the STEM Team East "Engineering Festival" in 2013... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Pentland

3:00pm

Use-Case Power Management Optimization: Identifying & Tracking Key Power Indicators - Patrick Titiano, BayLibre
Embedded platforms performances keep increasing, quicker than power and thermal budgets, making Power Management (PM) an essential element. This presentation describes the importance of identifying and tracking KPI (Key Performance Indicators: C-States statistics / OPerating Points (OPP) Usage / Interrupts Rates / MPU Load / Memory Usage / Running Clocks / Power Status / ...) on a per use-case basis, to optimize power consumption at system-level (battery), but also to maintain temperature within limits. Following a short introduction to standard KPI, a methodology will be illustrated with practical examples extracted from critical use-cases (MP3 AV Playback, OS Idle, 3D Gaming) run on a real product. The need for dedicated and automated power management tooling (embedded power measurements, kernel instrumentation, user-space tooling) will be also highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Titiano

Patrick Titiano

Embedded Power Management Engineer, BayLibre
Patrick Titiano has 15 years of engineering experience in embedded technologies. Patrick spent 9 years at Texas Instruments as a Power Management (PM) Expert. After 3 years as OMAP3 SW PM Architect (architecture, requirements, early prototyping), Patrick switched to a System PM Optimization role, tracking PM system issues of critical use-cases like Idle, MP3, Voice Call, Video Playback, 3D. Patrick also developed embedded diagnostic open source... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Tinto

3:15pm

3:35pm

Driver model, Kconfig and a little Patman
Speakers
avatar for Simon Glass

Simon Glass

Software Engineer, Google Inc
After writing a programmable RDBMS on ARM computers, Simon Glass worked at ARM in Cambridge, UK setting up the applications group, smart card effort and then working on ARM10. Returning to New Zealand, he started Bluewater Systems and grew it to 20 people, focussing on embedded ARM electronics/Linux. Simon then joined Google and to work on ARM Chromebooks (firmware lead). Simon is a primary contributor to U-Boot and maintains driver model and x86... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 3:35pm - 4:05pm
Harris 1

3:50pm

Break
Thursday October 24, 2013 3:50pm - 4:30pm
Foyer

4:30pm

U-Boot Mini Summit Open Discussion
Thursday October 24, 2013 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Harris 1

4:30pm

EFL - A UI Toolkit Designed for the Embedded World - Tom Hacohen, Samsung Electronics
The EFL is a set of libraries that provide stable API/ABI, high efficiency, low memory usage, and works seamlessly with and without hardware (GPU) acceleration. These reasons and more are why the EFL are being used, on refrigerators, home automation systems, mobile devices, and the Tizen mobile platform among others. In this presentation, Tom will present an overview of the EFL, review the current state, and discuss the future plans for the project. Tom will also present new and future projects that improve the EFL development experience.

Speakers
TH

Tom Hacohen

Senior Engineer, Samsung OSG
Tom has been using Linux since 2003. Previously a core developer and part of the leading team in SHR (Openmoko), he is currently a core developer for the EFL (www.enlightenment.org). He has contributed to other Open Source projects over the years, including: freesmartphone.org and libunibreak. In 2010 he started working at Samsung on the Tizen Linux platform.


Thursday October 24, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Pentland

4:30pm

Going Linux on Massive Multicore - Marta Rybczynska, Kalray
Multicore platforms have become Linux common environment. The next stage is hundreds of cores in one chip, what brings its own specific challenges and opportunities. In this talk we present the state of the work in progress on porting Linux to a part of Kalray's 256-core MPPA256 platform. We explain why it is a part of it, cover the subject of the effort to bring Linux to the MPPA's K1 VLIW core and then describe the peripheral support with the distributed device driver model, multi-stage boot process and performance-critical Network-on-Chip device support. This presentation intends to provide the developers basic information on massive multicore and the new subjects that must be addressed in Linux in the massive multicore world.

Speakers
MR

Marta Rybczynska

Software Engineer, Kalray
Marta Rybczynska has network security background and 10 years of experience in embedded development. She has been working with embedded operating systems like Linux and various real-time ones, system libraries and frameworks up to user interfaces. Currently she is working at Kalray on the device drivers and operating systems on the massive multicore MPPA256 platform. She has experience with presentations on both scientific and free software... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Fintry

4:30pm

Sigrok: Using Logic to Debug Logic - Matt Ranostay, Intel Open Source Technology Center
This talk will highlight the shortfalls of current debugging software for Linux using various cheap to expensive devices which some are completely Open Hardware. Sigrok project will be demoed in full along with some comparable OSS debugger based projects. Various things can be done within a Linux environment to progress low-level Linux development using logic analyzers + DSO + JTAG. Various features will be discussed including but not limited to simple + complex triggers, DDR mode hacks, and protocol decoding.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Ranostay

Matt Ranostay

Senior Software Engineer, Ranostay Consulting, LLC
Matt has worked in the Embedded Linux field in various roles for 10+ years at various companies including Embedded Alley, Mentor Graphics, and Intel's Open Source Technology Center.


Thursday October 24, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Carrick Suite

4:30pm

Status of Embedded Linux - Tim Bird, Sony Mobile
In this talk, Tim will discss the the recent status of the Linux with regard to embedded systems. This will include a review of the last year's worth of mainline kernel releases, as well as topic areas specifically related to embedded, such as boot-up time, security, system size, etc. Tim will also present recent and planned work by the CE Workgroup of the Linux Foundation, as well as analyze the current status of the industry, in terms of world domination.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engeineer, Sony Mobile
Tim Bird is a Senior Staff Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. Tim has been working with Linux for over 20 years and has spoken at numerous events, include almost all Embedded Linux Conferences, and many LinuxCon events.


Thursday October 24, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Tinto

5:30pm

Android Platform Debugging and Development - Karim Yaghmour, Opersys
While Android's use in embedded systems is now common, details about how to debug and develop in its internals are still hard to come by. Many very important questions therefore remain largely unanswered, such as: What's the best tools and techniques to follow a codepath from the app layer all the way down the kernel? How do I isolate a performance problem within the stack? What's the best way to edit and/or browse the Android sources? How can I set break points in Java code and still jump into the native C code that gets called from Java? This talk will explain the tools, techniques and, quite frankly, hacks that can be used to debug difficult problems within the Android stack. We'll cover both the tools and techniques that come from Linux and those that are Android specific. For example, we'll talk about Eclipse integration, Perf, ftrace, ddms, gdb, etc.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Fintry

5:30pm

Common Display Framework, Tomorrow's Linux Kernel Display Architecture - Laurent Pinchart, Ideas on board
Embedded systems are increasingly composed of IP cores and chips assembled to create advanced features. Display devices are no exception and comprise components that get reused from system to system. With their roots in the the desktop world, Linux display APIs haven't been developed with this architecture in mind and don't maximize flexibility and code reusability. The Common Display Framework will reshape the display architecture in a modular and more future-proof way. It creates separate drivers for distinct components in the display pipeline and orchestrates communication between them. This talk will present ongoing work on CDF and will discuss future directions for userspace API enhancements. This talk is addressed to developers who want to learn about tomorrow's Linux kernel display architecture. Familiarity with the basic display concepts is recommended but not mandatory.

Speakers
avatar for Laurent Pinchart

Laurent Pinchart

Ideas on board, Ideas on board
Laurent Pinchart has been a Linux kernel developer since 2001. He has written media-related Linux drivers for consumer and embedded devices and is one of the V4L core developers. Laurent is the founder and owner of Ideas on Board, a company specialized in embedded Linux design and development. He has given | Linux kernel-related talks at the FOSDEM, LPC and ELC. He currently works with the Renesas Linux kernel team where he develops a wide... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Tinto

5:30pm

LLVMLinux: The Linux Kernel with Dragon Wings - Behan Webster, Converse in Code Inc.
The LLVM project is an extensive compiler technology suite which is becoming commonplace in many industries. Technology built with LLVM is already shipped in millions of Linux devices as a part of Android/Renderscript. Increasingly it is becoming a big part of the development process for embedded projects, all the way up through to high performance computing clusters. This session will provide an update on the status of the LLVMLinux project; a project which is cooperating with both the Linux kernel and LLVM communities to build the Linux kernel with Clang/LLVM. This talk is for developers and system integrators who are interested in LLVM technologies and using clang to build the Linux Kernel.

Speakers
avatar for Behan Webster

Behan Webster

Chief Engineer, Converse in Code Inc
Behan Webster has spent two decades in diverse tech industries such as telecom, datacom, optical, and automotive writing code for a range of hardware from the very small to the very large. He has Linux experience spans kernel programming, Embedded Linux, and board bring-up. Currently Behan is the lead consultant at Converse in Code Inc, an embedded Linux engineer and project lead working on the LLVMLinux project as well as being a Trainer for The... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Pentland

5:30pm

Modernize Embedded Linux Software Development Tools to Achieve Development Anywhere - Jessica Zhang, Intel Open Source Technology Center
For projects that involve Embedded Linux software development, sometimes developers are unable to use Linux as their primary development host OS. How can they achieve solid embedded Linux cross development with this mixed environment setup? Currently there are some ways to tweak the host's setup to work around the issues, but they typically are cumbersome and far from robust. In this presentation, Jessica Zhang reviews the innovative path-finding features of the Yocto Project's Web Hob application and Eclipse plug-in running on non-Linux platforms for remote development. Jessica also discusses the usage model of these features that aims to provide ease of use and a robust development environment to achieve development anywhere.

Speakers
JZ

Jessica Zhang

Software Engineer Manager, Intel
Jessica Zhang is a software engineer working at Intel Open Source Technology Center on Yocto Project. Her focused areas is developer experience improvement tools, e.g. ADT (application developement toolkit), web hob, hob and the maintainer of Eclipse plug-in. She has given talks and presentations at various Linux Foundation conferences including LinuxCon (North America, Europe and Japan), ELC North America and ELC-E. She also taught sessions at... Read More →


Thursday October 24, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Carrick Suite

6:30pm

 
Friday, October 25
 

8:30am

Registration
Friday October 25, 2013 8:30am - 5:00pm
Strathblane Hall

9:30am

Keynote - Embedded Build Systems Panel - Tim Bird, Sony Mobile; Ross Burton, Intel; Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons; Karim Yaghmour, Opersys; Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel (Moderator)
Embedded Linux isn't like "normal" Linux, which is available in tidy little distros where someone else makes all the tough decisions about what gets included. In the embedded world, the developer decides everything from the system content to the method for building that
content into a cohesive package, and very often that same developer also makes decisions about the hardware. This is one busy developer. So in that context, the question of "which embedded Linux is best?" takes on many facets. Which kernel, which packages, and which drivers? Which build system is best, and under which circumstances? Should I start with Buildroot, use a pre-designed solution like Android, follow emerging standards like the Yocto Project, or just DIY - which even some large corporations do? This panel brings together a team of four seasoned embedded engineers to discuss how they make decisions and solve problems.

Panelists:
DIY: Tim Bird
Android: Karim Yaghmour
Buildroot: Thomas Petazzoni
Yocto Project: Ross Burton 

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Osier-Mixon

Jeff Osier-Mixon

Open Source Community Engineer, Intel Corporation / Yocto Project
Jefro works at Intel Corporation as the community manager for the Yocto Project. He has been involved in embedded Linux for many years, and regularly speaks at Linux conferences worldwide.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engeineer, Sony Mobile
Tim Bird is a Senior Staff Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. Tim has been working with Linux for over 20 years and has spoken at numerous events, include almost all Embedded Linux Conferences, and many LinuxCon events.
RB

Ross Burton

Userspace Architect, Intel
Ross Burton is a Userspace Architect for the Yocto Project at Intel, leading the direction of upper-stack components such as X, Wayland, Bluez and systemd. Previously he has worked at OpenedHand on Maemo and Poky before the Yocto Project existed, before being acquired by Intel to work on MeeGo and Moblin. Recently he has given presentations about Yocto Project at the Automotive Linux Summit and Intel's OSTS.
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 9:30am - 10:10am
Pentland

10:10am

Break
Friday October 25, 2013 10:10am - 10:40am
Foyer

10:40am

(BoFs) Power-Aware Scheduling - Morten Rasmussen, ARM, Ltd.
There has been an increasing interest in power-aware scheduling on LKML recently. While most seem to agree that something should be done, it is not agreed what the goal is and how is should be reached. Integration of scheduler and existing power management frameworks (cpuidle and cpufreq) can potentially be a part of the solution. The purpose of this session is to have a discussion about the way forward for improving power-awareness in the Linux kernel scheduler.

Speakers
MR

Morten Rasmussen

Software Engineer, ARM, Ltd.
Morten Rasmussen (Staff Software Engineer, ARM Ltd.) Morten is working in the software power management team at ARM. His main interests are Linux scheduling, workload analysis and power management frameworks. Morten has previously given presentations at Linux Plumbers Conference, Linaro Connect and LF Collaboration Summit.


Friday October 25, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Tinto

10:40am

Best practices for Long-Term Support and Security of the Device-Tree (DT) - Alison Chaiken, Mentor Graphics
The DT provides an inheritance mechanism for the hardware (HW) description of a peripheral set via layered include files. Inevitably violations of best design practices like level separation and smart variable naming will cause headaches. Extensions like macro preprocessing, overlays, and description of hypervisors will further complicate DT source (DTS) design. Specification of a board's features now requires DTS (soon to be in its own repo) in addition to kernel and bootloader configuration files and firmware. The only way to check the compatibility and consistency of these files is by booting on HW. Re-configuration of HW capabilities by modifying a DT blob without changing the kernel is convenient but affects update strategy. Notably, DT binaries are not signed for security. DT presents particular maintenance problems in industries like automotive where product life is in decades.

Speakers
AC

Alison Chaiken

Mentor Graphics Embedded Software Division
Alison works for Mentor Graphics Embedded Software Division in Fremont, CA. Her automotive Linux career began at Nokia, where she ported MeeGo-IVI to the Pandaboard. Her previous speaking experience includes the North American Embedded Linux Conference, Automotive Linux Summit, Southern California Linux Expo, Maker Faire and many local Linux user groups. In addition, she has presented many demonstrations at exhibition booths. Alison has been... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Fintry

10:40am

Secure Embedded Linux Product - A Success Story - Martin Bis, BIS-LINUX.COM
Embedded Linux is being used in more and more fields of: consumer, industrial and communication devices. Security is becoming an increasingly important issue for producers and users of these systems. Security of embedded systems is not only about: non-trivial root password, encrypted communication protocols and signed firmware. Both: the design of the device itself and the fact that It often works autonomously, in an inaccessible location, opens up a whole new possible fields of attack. Marcin Bis will review various methods of securing and encrypting whole system on various ARM-based hardware. Complete, working solution of ecryptfs, NAND encryption and secure boot techniques combined to provide a passively-secured system will be demonstrated, including a build system. The presentation is based on experience gained during R&D on home and industrial automation products.

Speakers
avatar for Marcin Bis

Marcin Bis

Embedded Linux Engineer, BIS-LINUX.COM
I have been dealing with Linux in embedded systems since 2007. I run a consulting company bis-linux.com. I help my customers to create business value on every step of product life-cycle by mentoring engineers and working as Embedded Linux Engineer or Technical Leader. I provide Embedded Linux, Drivers Development and Yocto trainings (both: open and on-site). I wrote books covering Embedded Linux topics (in Polish 2007, 2005). I have experience in... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Carrick Suite

10:40am

Yocto Project & OpenEmbedded BoF - Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel Corporation
The Yocto Project and OpenEmbedded project welcomes all interested folks for an open discussion about working with these projects.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Osier-Mixon

Jeff Osier-Mixon

Open Source Community Engineer, Intel Corporation / Yocto Project
Jefro works at Intel Corporation as the community manager for the Yocto Project. He has been involved in embedded Linux for many years, and regularly speaks at Linux conferences worldwide.


Friday October 25, 2013 10:40am - 11:30am
Pentland

11:40am

Linux Kernel Debug And Profiling Tools - Nicolas Launet, Adeneo Embedded
Debugging, tracing and profiling are key tasks of any development process, including Linux kernel ones. In this area, the mainline Linux kernel comes with support for several internal events, probe primitives and break/watch functionality. Linux kernel communities provide many tools to use these features, either maintained in the mainline kernel, either available as external modules. Of course, no tool can replace a skilled developer with a good knowledge of the kernel, however that fact does not make tools useless either. In this presentation, Nicolas Launet will review several debugging, tracing and profiling tools freely available for Linux kernel development, expose how they work and discuss their strengths and limitations. The presentation will be illustrated with examples using kgdb, lttng, systemtap, perf and others.

Speakers
NL

Nicolas Launet

Embedded Linux Engineer, Adeneo Embedded
Nicolas Launet is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Adeneo Embedded. After some experience in video game and security appliance development, Nicolas joined Adeneo in 2007 to focus on Embedded Linux systems. Since then, he has worked as a jack of all trades on several Linux based projects in military, automotive and other industry domains with developments ranging from custom board bring up, toolchain and build system adaptation to... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 11:40am - 12:30am
Carrick Suite

11:40am

Android on Non-Mobile Embedded Systems - Arnout Vandecappelle, Essensium
We've gotten used to building embedded systems based on Linux, but now Android is the new hype and now managers are asking why we're not using it. One good reason to use Android is to be able to reuse part of the GUI for a smartphone app. In this talk, Arnout Vandecappelle will describe such a project and the difficulties encountered to make it a true embedded system, including upgrades, watchdog, etc. The talk also shows another project where we chose to stay with a more traditional Linux/Qt system and the reasons for doing so.

Speakers
AV

Arnout Vandecappelle

Senior Embedded Software Architect, Essensium
Arnout Vandecappelle is working as Senior Embedded Software Architect at Essensium - Mind. As such, he provides consultancy and services for customers based on Linux and Open Source Software for Embedded Systems, ranging from driver development and debugging over system integration to application development. He has contributed to several open source projects, including buildroot and GStreamer. Previously he has been working for 10 years at... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Pentland

11:40am

Bridging the Gap Between Hardware and Software Tracing - Christian Babeux, EfficiOS Inc.
For a numbers of years, silicon vendors have been providing hardware tracing facilities to embedded developers. By using these, developers can resolve performance and latency issues more quickly, resulting in shorter time to market. In this talk, we will cover the hardware based tracing facilities offered by various manufacturers and see how they differ from their software counterparts with respect to their instrumentation capabilities, transport mechanisms, output formats, etc. We will also show how joint hardware and software tracing can be used by developers to gain deeper insights in their applications’ behaviour. Finally, we will outline the on-going work within the Linux Trace Toolkit next generation (LTTng) project to enhance hardware tracing support and tracing data visualization.

Speakers
avatar for Christian Babeux

Christian Babeux

Software Developer, EfficiOS Inc.
Christian Babeux works at EfficiOS Inc., an operating system efficiency R&D consultancy. He is currently involved in the LTTng project as an active contributor to lttng-tools and lttng-ust. He has a background in embedded software development and ASIC tools. In his spare time, he maintains packages in the AUR for the Arch Linux distribution and other personal open-source projects. He has spoken at conferences such as the Linux Foundation... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Fintry

11:40am

Linux Secured Integrity – Protection Against Remote Attacks - Holger Dengler, Linutronix GmbH/Germany
Embedded systems are more and more the goal of remote attacks. Linux provides a lot of features, that helps a developer to build a resistant protection for such systems. This talk describes a combination of such security features to harden the system against remote attacks. It also describe how far you can get without having special security hardware on board and where the limits are.

Speakers
HD

Holger Dengler

Developer, Linutronix GmbH/Germany
Holger Dengler, *7.2.1969, working at Linutronix GmbH/Germany as Developer, Consultant and Trainer. Linutronix is focused on embedded Linux and Linux-Realtime, I cover the focus areas Security and Flash Memory. Former engagements include IBM Germany Research & Development (Crypto Hardware Support for Linux on System z) Daimler Benz Research.


Friday October 25, 2013 11:40am - 12:30pm
Tinto

12:30pm

Lunch
Friday October 25, 2013 12:30pm - 2:00pm
On Your Own

2:00pm

Buildroot: What's New - Peter Korsgaard
Buildroot is a simple, efficient and easy-to-use embedded Linux build system. It can generate a cross-compilation toolchain, a Linux kernel image, bootloader images and more importantly a root filesystem image with many userspace libraries and programs. Based on cross-compilation, Buildroot supports more than 1000 userspace packages, including GStreamer, X.org, Qt, Gtk and more.

Used by Google, many SoC vendors, and numerous embedded systems makers, Buildroot is backed by a strong and active open-source community, that publishes stable releases every three months.

Through this talk, we would like to share a little introduction on how to use Buildroot, and then cover the new important features and improvements that have been implemented during the last two years.

Speakers
PK

Peter Korsgaard

Peter Korsgaard has been involved with embedded Linux for more than ten years: First with handhelds.org, later nslu2-linux.org and now maintains Buildroot and a number of device drivers in the Linux kernel. Peter works for Barco where he handles the low level software stack for their products.


Friday October 25, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Carrick Suite

2:00pm

Node.JS Appliances on Embedded Linux Devices - Mehmet Fatih Karagoz, Aseisan & Cevahir Turgut, Aseisan
Node.js is one of the most trendy technologies nowadays. Node.js is built on Google's V8 javascript engine and provides a fast development environment. This presentation will cover the areas we can use Node.js in embedded linux devices. Before talking about applications, we will explain the cross-compiling process of Node.js and the NPM package manager for embedded linux devices. After setting up the environment, the talk will explain how Node.js can be used for scripting in embedded devices. Additionally, it will focus on development story of a surveillance camera application using Node.js platform on embedded linux. Inside the camera, the messaging between server/client, the web interface and IPC are developed by using Node.js platform.

Speakers
MF

Mehmet Fatih Karagoz

Embedded Software Developer, Aseisan
Mehmet Fatih Karagoz is an embedded software developer specializing in the integration of hardware and software at kernel and boot-loader levels, and video application development on embedded linux devices. He worked on development and porting the kernel and boot-loaders for bringing up various OMAP3 based custom boards developed at Aselsan. Additionally, he has experience on the video infrastructure of surveillance IP camera applications.
CT

Cevahir Turgut

Embedded Software Developer, Aseisan
Cevahir Turgut is an embedded software developer specializing in the networking including client/server messaging, IPC, web interface on embedded linux devices. He worked on development of networking infrastructure of surveillance IP camera systems. He has solid background on embedded software development including linux, integrity and various kinds of microcontrollers.


Friday October 25, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Fintry

2:00pm

Optimize DMA Configuration in Encryption Use Case - Guillene Ribiere, BayLibre SAS
This presentation describes how hardware instrumentation IPs embedded into the OMAP4 interconnect were used in order to debug and improve the performance of the system DMA. This system DMA was involved into a data encryption pipeline which was under performing in comparison to theoretical expectations prior to this analysis. Usual tools were first used: Tracing, Systemtap. However in such a use case where several hardware accelerators are first configured and then used in the data path in a data pipe lining fashion, such tools could not help to pinpoint the exact performance gap. In order to get visibility into what was happening, hardware tools called OCP watchpoint were activated and used. They allowed to identify issues in the system DMA configuration and to quantify the latency budget among the different contributors.

Speakers
GR

Guillene Ribiere

BayLibre SAS
Guillène is now with a company called BayLibre.  Previously she was a senior systems engineer with 20 years of experience at Texas Insturments. Her last position was software architect for sensors for OMAP6 Android platforms with Texas Instruments. In this role, she was responsible for integrating a new processor, the sensor hub, into the OMAP software stack. This implied both porting the RTOS sysBios onto the sensor hub and... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Pentland

2:00pm

Running Code in the Android Stack - Karim Yaghmour, Opersys
The Android stack is huge, by any standard. There are many subsystems, many layers, and many abstractions. Yet, only one very specific set of its layers is documented: the Android app developer API. Still, there are dozens of ways to get code to run in the Android stack, most of which are undocumented or require a firm understanding of the platform's internals. This talk will go through the various ways to get code to run in the Android stack and explain the pros and cons of each method. From shell scripts to system services, we'll cover the persistent flag, generating custom SDK add-ons, creating command-line Java applications, running native daemons and launching shell commands from standard apps.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 2:00pm - 2:50pm
Tinto

3:00pm

An Essential Relationship between Real-time and Resource Partitioning - Yoshitake Kobayashi,Toshiba
Running real-time and general purpose applications on a same hardware is normally a crazy idea in most case. However, we strongly focus to run both applications on a hardware without virtualization. Resource Partitioning enables the assignment of hardware resource (e.g.: core, execution time, memory bandwidth or device access) to processes with special requirements (e.g: real-time performance or safety requirements).

In this talk, we would like to discuss current limitation on Linux kernel and describe how to solve it.

Speakers
YK

Yoshitake Kobayashi

Yoshitake Kobayashi joined Corporate Software Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation in 2008. Before that he received his Ph.D. degree in computer science at University of Electro-Communications in 2002 and worked as an assistant professor. His research interests include operating systems, distributed systems and dynamically reconfigurable systems.


Friday October 25, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Carrick Suite

3:00pm

Board File to Device Tree Migration: War Story - Pantelis Antoniou, Antoniou Consulting
As we all know Linus is a colorful character, but his taste in software design is impeccable. So it was hardly a big surprise when the famous edict about having all new ARM boards to use Device Tree, instead of a board file, was made. That single change forced a momentous shift in Linux based embedded software development, since a long list of cherished idioms (and a lot of questionable practices) have had to change. Device Tree due to it's purely data driver model, and focus on reusability, is quite tricky to come at terms at first, which is something we discovered during our porting efforts of the Beaglebone board support to DT. Join me in discussing they why, the how, and learn the hard lessons we at Beagleboard have learned moving to this new paradigm.

Speakers
PA

Pantelis Antoniou, Konsulko Group

Kernel Engineer, Konsulko Group
Pantelis Antoniou has been an active Linux kernel developer for more than 13 years. Has brought to market a lot of Linux based products, passing through companies like Texas Instruments, Mentor Graphics, before ending up with Konsulko Group, and his current engagement with NVIDIA. Over there he gets to make Linux play nice with cars. He has already been a speaker in two previous ELC's. His current interests are planting Device Trees on... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Fintry

3:00pm

Next-Generation DMABUF : How To Efficiently Play Back Video on Embedded Systems - Lucas Stach, Pengutronix
The current generation of embedded SoCs contain diverse loosely coupled hardware accelerator modules that need to cooperate in order to meet the needs of common use cases, like video playback with fluid 3D rendered user interfaces. Userspace is able to coordinate this work and pass around the used memory resources using opaque handles, by utilizing the recently introduced DMABUF kernel framework. This works well as long as the hardware modules have equal constraints on the memory layout. When requirements differ, for example if, as often the case on embedded systems, only parts of the pipeline support scather-gather DMA, the current DMABUF implementation reaches its limits. We propose in-kernel extensions to the existing DMABUF framework which allow to cover those cases without userspace-visible impact. We will walk through the necessary steps using the example of a simple video pipeline

Speakers
LS

Lucas Stach

Open-Source Developer, Pengutronix
Lucas Stach is an open-source developer with a focus on low-level graphics hardware drivers. He was somewhat involved with the Nouveau and TegraDRM driver project as a hobbyist and is now working as a full-time kernel developer at Pengutronix with a focus on the Freescale i.MX line of SoCs. He is hacking drivers across all subsystems to provide upstream kernel support for various industrial embedded systems. Previous talks from Lucas about... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Tinto

3:00pm

Using and Understanding the Real-Time Cyclictest Benchmark - Frank Rowand, Sony
Cyclictest results are the most frequently cited real-time Linux metric.  The core concept of Cyclictest is very simple.  However the test options are very extensive.  The meaning of Cyclictest results appear simple but are actually quite complex.  This talk will explore and explain the complexities of Cyclictest.  At the end of the talk, the audience will understand how Cyclictest results describe the potential real-time performance of a system.

This presentation will be useful and understandable for persons of all levels of technical expertise.

Speakers
avatar for Frank Rowand

Frank Rowand

Sony
Frank has meddled in the internals of several proprietary operating systems, but has been loyal to the Linux kernel since 1999. He has worked in many areas of technology, including performance, networking, platform support, drivers, real-time, and embedded. He is currently employed by Sony Mobile Communications. | | Frank has presented at many CELF Embedded Linux Conferences in the US and Europe, LinuxCon Japan, Japan Linux Symposium, LinuxCon... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 3:00pm - 3:50pm
Pentland

3:50pm

Break
Friday October 25, 2013 3:50pm - 4:30pm
Foyer

4:30pm

(BoFs) Hardware Trace in the Kernel - Pawel Moll, ARM
Most "embedded architectures" (TM) provide non-intrusive means of obtaining diagnostic and performance data about the processor and the system. Known under many names like processor or hardware tracing, it used to be a domain of of very expensive, proprietrary software and hardware solutions (aka probes, trace boxes etc). It is about time to change this situation and provide means of accesing all these feature from the system itself. There were more or less (mostly less) successful attempts to implement "trace frameworks" in the past. The presentation will summarize those and describe the approach I am taking while implementing the framework and drivers for ARM CoreSight trace infrastructure. I want to highlight the opportunity we have to improve our visibility of the system and I am hoping for feedback regarding user expectations and desired interface.

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Moll

Pawel Moll

Principal Engineer, ARM
I've worked with so called "embedded Linux" for more then ten years now, currently for ARM in Cambridge, UK as a Principal Engineer, with main focus on Linux developer tools, in all possible form and shape. My recent interest include performance analysis and optimisation. Every now and then I also act as a trainer on ARM software courses, write developer articles and give technical talks (including many LinuxCon Europe and ELC-E conferences).


Friday October 25, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Pentland

4:30pm

Are Embedded Buildsystems Still Needed? - Koen Kooi, Circuitco Electronics
In the past decade the OpenEmbedded buildsystem has gained support for pretty much every relevant GUI and IPC technology and has been able to be self hosting for some years now: the buildsystem can (cross)build all its dependencies so it can run on the target as well. This means that developers will never need to touch OE for their work if they can live with the relatively long native buildtimes. If you buy a Beaglebone or Minnowboard you will get a full featured OE built distro pre-installed: Angstrom. As a real distribution with online package feeds it has prebuilt packages of the most popular software and provides the tools to build the missing bits yourself. And if you don't like Angstrom you can install fedora/arch/gentoo on those boards. So why are things like OE and buildroot still needed? This presentation will show why OE is still needed and how Angstrom uses it.

Speakers
KK

Koen Kooi

Release Manager, Linaro
Koen is the lead developer of the Angstrom distribution, a core developer of the OpenEmbedded project. He works for Linaro as the release manager as his day job.


Friday October 25, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Tinto

4:30pm

Debugging Electronics for the Software Engineer - Attila Kinali, Art of Technology
Getting a new embedded linux device up and running is not easy. It involves debugging your software, which hasn't been tested yet, and the hardware at the same time, with no way to know which one is at fault. Software debugging techniques are well known in the community, but debugging techniques for hardware aren't. To goal of this talk is to give an overview of how to figure out whether the problem is hardware or software, to debug hardware in an efficient manner, to spot errors in the hardware design that weren't visible until the software has been considered and presenting a workflow with which most problems can be pinned down.

Speakers
AK

Attila Kinali

Engineer, Trolls Inc.
As an active open source activist for 15 years, Attila Kinali has contributed to many projects in different fields. But his real passion lies in designing electronics. He has always been striving to build electronics using open source tools as much as possible. Having designed electronics for companies with special requirements and in different fields, he has ammased knowledge covering almost every part of electronics, from sensor to RF... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Carrick Suite

4:30pm

SPDX and the Yocto Project - Mark Hatle, Wind River
An update of the work integrating the SPDX (license information) standard with the work of the Yocto Project / OpenEmbedded. Mark will explain why embedded developers need to pay attention to license information, and why SPDX is so important. Followed by a description of the work that has been done to integrate th SPDX information into the Yocto Project environment; including remote license identification using Fossology, a shared service to capture license information, and efforts to integrate these fetures into the build environment itself. In addition a roadmap of the next steps will be introduced.

Speakers
MH

Mark Hatle

Product Lead, Wind River
Mark has been involved with creating and managing Linux distributions since 1997, and specifically embedded Linux systems since 2000. Starting in 1997 he was involved with MkLinux and later the Linux/PPC Reference Release. In 2000 MontaVista Software hired him to help with everything from build systems, toolchains to userspace integration. Since 2005 he has worked for Wind River, working on many of the same types of systems. Mark has also been... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 4:30pm - 5:20pm
Fintry

5:30pm

Barebox and Bootloader Specification - Sascha Hauer, Pengutronix
Desktop people are used to having a menu with possible boot entries presented during boot. For some reason embedded bootloaders dropped the concept of boot entries in favor of a flexible but board specific environment. This made installation of a general-purpose distribution a highly board specific task. The freedesktop.org bootloader specification aims at making it possible
for the distribution to make itself bootable. This will give control over the boot process back to the distributions. In this talk Sascha Hauer will give an overview about the efforts made in barebox to implement this specification and the special design considerations needed in embedded systems. Other topics include how devicetree is used in barebox to avoid bord specific code and the newly introduced multiboard support which was promised last year at the ELCE.

Speakers
SH

Sascha Hauer

Sascha Hauer is working as a kernel developer at Pengutronix, Germany. In his day job he is porting Linux to various embedded systems, mostly Freescale i.MX. Being frustrated | by the limitations of current bootloaders he forked U-Boot in 2007.


Friday October 25, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Tinto

5:30pm

Building Interesting and Complex Robotics Using x86 Computers - John Hawley, Red Hat
Most hobbyist robots that are present in the market target simple tasks, from simple line following robots to the computationally simplistic battle bots (which are mostly remote controlled). With the rise in relatively inexpensive and low powered x86 machines we now have the capability to do much more computationally interesting things within the robot chassis. Specifically it means onboard complex computation can be done, giving robots much greater autonomy than using arduinos or complex microcontrollers. This greater computational capacity gives us the ability to make use of much more complex sensors, do onboard real-time image analysis as well as give the ability to use much more powerful and complex control system like wifi, zigbee and cellular modems. This talk is mainly aimed at discussing the ramifications of using low power x86 machines to act as the brains of modern robots.

Speakers
JH

John Hawley

Open Hardware Technical Evangelist, Intel - OTC / MinnowBoard
John 'Warthog9' Hawley led the system administration team on kernel.org for nearly a decade. His other exploits include working on Syslinux, OpenSSI, a caching Gitweb, and patches to bind to enable GeoDNS. He's the author of PXE Knife, Boot Boot, as well as SyncDiff(erent) a state-full file synchronizer and file transfer mechanism. He currently woks for Intel working on Open Hardware, and the Minnowboard. In his free time he enjoys cooking... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Fintry

5:30pm

Building Robots That Can See - Scott Garman, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
Computer vision capabilities are a key enabler of autotomous robotic control, allowing machines to make decisions based on what they "see." The OpenCV library is an open source computer vision and machine learning library used by companies including Intel, Google, Sony, Honda, and Toyota. This talk will explore the use of OpenCV in a fun autonomous robotics project that is affordable and easy to replicate, using the power of the Yocto Project embedded Linux platform (yoctoproject.org) and the MinnowBoard (minnowboard.org).

Speakers
avatar for Scott Garman

Scott Garman

Embedded Linux Engineer and Technical Evangelist, Intel's Open Source Technology Center
Scott Garman is an Embedded Linux Engineer and Technical Evangelist at Intel's Open Source Technology Center. He is a core team member of the Yocto Project and is cultivating an open source community around the MinnowBoard embedded hardware platform. Scott is active in the open source developer community in Portland, OR.


Friday October 25, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Carrick Suite

5:30pm

Technology Showcase with the Yocto Project - Ross Burton, Intel
In the last year several important new technologies have been integrated into the Yocto Project, including systemd, Wayland, fortify, GTK+ 3 and Qt 5. This session will give an overview of each of these, how they can be used with the Yocto Project to make your product better, and assuming the demo pixies behave a live demo.

Speakers
RB

Ross Burton

Userspace Architect, Intel
Ross Burton is a Userspace Architect for the Yocto Project at Intel, leading the direction of upper-stack components such as X, Wayland, Bluez and systemd. Previously he has worked at OpenedHand on Maemo and Poky before the Yocto Project existed, before being acquired by Intel to work on MeeGo and Moblin. Recently he has given presentations about Yocto Project at the Automotive Linux Summit and Intel's OSTS.


Friday October 25, 2013 5:30pm - 6:20pm
Pentland

6:20pm

Break
Friday October 25, 2013 6:20pm - 6:30pm
Foyer

6:30pm

Closing Game
Friday October 25, 2013 6:30pm - 8:00pm
Pentland